Author Archives: weezeedee

Louise Dubin, Philippe Muller and Katie Schlaikjer play Bach Suites 3,4 and 6 tomorrow. Free concert at St. Paul’s Chapel @TrinityWallSt!

Three of J. S. Bach’s solo cello suites performed in one of the best acoustical spaces in Manhattan, the landmark St. Paul’s Chapel (1766!). If you love the cello, and Bach, you won’t want to miss this one! Reception after the performance.  More info here: https://www.trinitywallstreet.org/events/day?day=2019-04-07&nid=18590

St. Paul’s is a special place for New Yorkers.  It survived the 9/11 attacks (miraculously, given its vicinity to the WTC) and became a ministry and oasis for the workers who had the endless horror-filled task of working through the debris.  I was a grad student at IU in September 2011, but I was back in NYC that day to play with the NJSO, so witnessed the strikes first-hand: first on my way to Newark, and when train service into NY were finally restored, in Manhattan.  I visited St. Paul’s months later and was so deeply moved by what they were doing that I wrote this article: https://blogdaysofauguste.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/e2b83-2014-06-29_louise_wtc_article.pdf

 

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Our Salle Gaveau, Paris performance of my Franchomme transcriptions on Performance Today, 1/9/19!

Tune in to Fred Child @FredChildPT @perf_today tomorrow, 1/9/19, for our live performance in Salle Gaveau #Paris of three #Franchomme unpublished #cello quartets, transcribed and completed by me from Franchomme’s manuscripts. Louise Dubin, Raphael Pidoux, Philippe Muller, and Gauthier Brouton, cellists. 2nd Hour, nationwide @NPR syndicate stations, and streaming here:

https://www.yourclassical.org/programs/performance-today

 

Concert Tonight #NYC!

Dear friends and colleagues,

Please join me, Julia Bruskin Wunsch and Spencer Myer for a FREE salon concert of duos, sonatas and showpieces by Debussy, Auguste Franchomme, Chopin, Fauré, Philippe Hersant, Koechlin, and Poulenc.

Thursday, October 18, 7 PM
Maison Française, Columbia University, East Gallery, Buell Hall
More information and RSVP here:

http://maisonfrancaise.org/variations-on-a-french-theme

All solo Bach Concert May 15th NYC!

On Tuesday, May 15th, I’ll be joining forces with Franchomme Project album guest cellist Saeunn Thorsteinsdottir, as well as Alberto Parrini and Katie Schlaikjer, for a program of all Bach solo cello suites at the landmark John Street Church, one of the loveliest spaces and best acoustics in NYC!  Details and tickets here:

https://bachcello.brownpapertickets.com

We hope to see you there!  –Louise

Franchomme Edition featured in Le Violoncelle!

Selected Works for Cello and Piano by Auguste Franchomme, Edited and with Introduction by Louise Dubin  (Dover Publications, 2017) headlines the recommended scores in Le Violoncelle‘s September 2017 issue!  This is the magazine of the Association Française du Violoncelle…my copy arrived just recently, so this post is a bit late.

Click here for more information about the edition:

Info Sheet Selected Works for Cello and Piano Franchomme ed intr Dubin

religieuse poésie: a concert review from 1853

© Louise Dubin 2017

On February 16, 1848, Chopin gave his first concert in Paris since 1842, at the Salle Pleyel, nº 22 rue Rochechouart. The cost of tickets was unprecedented:  20 francs for each of the 300 seats available (the best seat at the Opera went for 12 francs).  The program included Chopin’s first public performance of his new sonata for piano and cello, Op. 65, with its dedicatee, Auguste Franchomme.   Little did anyone know that this would be Chopin’s final publication; nor that this concert would be Chopin’s last in Paris, ever.  Less than a week later, the 1848 Revolution erupted, forcing King Louis-Philippe to flee and eventually to abdicate the throne.  Chopin left Paris shortly afterwards, and when he returned he was too ill to perform.

Franchomme and Chopin played only the last three movements of the sonata in 1848 because, according to Frederick Niecks, a misguided listener at a house run-through had criticized the first movement as “too obscure, involved too many ideas.”  After Chopin’s death, Franchomme returned to the Salle Pleyel to perform the complete Op. 65 on April 6, 1853, with Thomas Tellefsen, who’d studied with Chopin for a few years and become his friend.  This time, nobody complained about the first movement.

Léon Kreutzer published his account in the Revue et Gazette Musicale de Paris on April 10th, 1853: “Le morceau principal était une sonate de Chopin, pour piano et violoncelle…cette oeuvre a quelque chose d’intime et de mystérieux, c’est que tout en elle est plaintif et mélancolique… Franchomme, sur son eloquent violoncelle, a trouvé des accents admirables, qui donnaient aux belles melodies de Chopin une suavité pénétrante et pleine de religieuse poésie.”

“The main piece was a sonata by Chopin for cello and piano…the piece has something intimate and mysterious, everything in it is plaintive and melancholic… Franchomme, on his eloquent cello, found admirable expression, giving the beautiful melodies of Chopin a penetrating sweetness, full of religious poetry.”

They sure knew how to write about a great concert back then!